Skip Header

You are using a version of browser that may not display all the features of this website. Please consider upgrading your browser.

P450XXI (steroid 21-hydroxylase) gene deletions are not found in family studies of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

Matteson K.J., Phillips J.A. III, Miller W.L., Chung B.C., Orlando P.J., Frisch H., Ferrandez A., Burr I.M.

Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a common genetic disorder due to defective 21-hydroxylation of steroid hormones. The human P450XXIA2 gene encodes cytochrome P450c21 [steroid 21-monooxygenase (steroid 21-hydroxylase), EC 1.14.99.10], which mediates 21-hydroxylation. The P450XXIA2 gene may be distinguished from the duplicated P450XXIA1 pseudogene by cleavage with the restriction endonuclease Taq I, with the XXIA2 gene characterized by a 3.7-kilobase (kb) fragment and the XXIA1 pseudogene characterized by a 3.2-kb fragment. Restriction endonuclease mapping by several laboratories has suggested that deletion of the P450XXIA2 gene occurs in about 25% of patients with CAH, as their genomic DNA lacks detectable 3.7-kb Taq I fragments. We have cloned human P450c21 cDNA and used it to study genomic DNA prepared from 51 persons in 10 families, each of which includes 2 or more persons with CAH. After Taq I digestion, apparent deletions are seen in 7 of the 20 alleles of the probands; using EcoRI, apparent deletions are seen in 9 of the 20 alleles. However, the apparently deleted alleles seen with Taq I do not coincide with those seen with EcoRI. Furthermore, studies with Bgl II, EcoRI, Kpn I, and Xba I yield normal patterns with at least two enzymes in all cases. Since all probands yielded normal patterns with at least two of the five enzymes used, we conclude that the P450XXIA2 gene "deletions" widely reported in CAH patients probably represent gene conversions, unequal crossovers, or polymorphisms rather than simple gene deletions.

Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 84:5858-5862(1987) [PubMed] [Europe PMC]

UniProt is an ELIXIR core data resource
Main funding by: National Institutes of Health

We'd like to inform you that we have updated our Privacy Notice to comply with Europe’s new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) that applies since 25 May 2018.

Do not show this banner again