Skip Header

You are using a version of browser that may not display all the features of this website. Please consider upgrading your browser.

Deciphering the biology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from the complete genome sequence.

Cole S.T., Brosch R., Parkhill J., Garnier T., Churcher C.M., Harris D.E., Gordon S.V., Eiglmeier K., Gas S., Barry C.E. III, Tekaia F., Badcock K., Basham D., Brown D., Chillingworth T., Connor R., Davies R.M., Devlin K., Feltwell T., Gentles S., Hamlin N., Holroyd S., Hornsby T., Jagels K., Krogh A., McLean J., Moule S., Murphy L.D., Oliver S., Osborne J., Quail M.A., Rajandream M.A., Rogers J., Rutter S., Seeger K., Skelton S., Squares S., Squares R., Sulston J.E., Taylor K., Whitehead S., Barrell B.G.

Countless millions of people have died from tuberculosis, a chronic infectious disease caused by the tubercle bacillus. The complete genome sequence of the best-characterized strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, H37Rv, has been determined and analysed in order to improve our understanding of the biology of this slow-growing pathogen and to help the conception of new prophylactic and therapeutic interventions. The genome comprises 4,411,529 base pairs, contains around 4,000 genes, and has a very high guanine + cytosine content that is reflected in the biased amino-acid content of the proteins. M. tuberculosis differs radically from other bacteria in that a very large portion of its coding capacity is devoted to the production of enzymes involved in lipogenesis and lipolysis, and to two new families of glycine-rich proteins with a repetitive structure that may represent a source of antigenic variation.

Nature 393:537-544(1998) [PubMed] [Europe PMC]